Startups

Episode 21: Bart Bradshaw, VP of Strategy & Finance, Blip

Bart talks about building a business rooted in authenticity, building a career at any stage of life, mastering the art of the “side hustle” and having fun.


This week on The CoSell Show we are excited to have Bart Bradshaw, VP of Strategy & Finance at Blip.

 

Topics Discussed:  

    1. Making 2020 the year of fun

    2. Building a business built for long-term success rooted in authenticity

    3. How to build the career you want (at any stage of your life)

    4. Mastering the art of the “side hustle”

 

Bart's Projects & Contact Info:

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Follow Along With The Podcast Transcript

Taylor Baker:
Hello, listeners and welcome to this decade's first episode of the CoSell Show. Today we are going to discuss how and why you should make 2020 the year of fun. Why authenticity is the key to building a business for longterm success, how to build the career you want in any stage of life, mastering the art of the side hustle and more. Who better to kick off 2020 with than Bart Bradshaw, VP of strategy and finance at Blip. Welcome, Bart.

Bart Bradshaw:
Thank you, Taylor.

Taylor Baker:
We are so happy to have you. Thank you for being here. So to kick things off, can you tell our listeners a little bit more about your background and your current role at Blip?

Bart Bradshaw:
Sure, yeah. You being there in Austin takes me back, actually. That's where I started my career out of undergrad at Dell, which a lot of your people there probably have been there as well. Yeah, I was in sales at Dell. I have an interesting background. I find it interesting because I've always known that I was all over the place. I love every subject.

I started out in sales. I went into finance and accounting. I thought I might become a strategic CFO, but then I went to business school and translated my experience into innovation and strategy, and managing small ventures within bigger companies like Intel. And now I'm at a startup. I always knew that I would be going after that smaller startup scene. I just didn't know when. That's my career trajectory is lots of big companies, a few different functional roles within that big company atmosphere. I learned a ton there. And then now over the last few years, I've been really going after smaller startup types of things, either at a big company or now at an actual startup.

Oh man, I love working in startups. That's where my heart is. Currently, I'm VP of strategy and finance. Previous to this, I was a VP of partnerships and channels. We're going through interesting, changes. And growing quickly and you have to wear a lot of hats at a startup. That's the reason for the change someone needed to ... Basically, I'm raising capital and doing other things to get us to the next level of Blip.

Taylor Baker:
Wonderful. Thank you so much for sharing. Listeners, Bart is my first fellow Longhorn, so he also did go to UT here in Austin. I'm really excited to have a fellow Longhorn on the other side of the night. So one of our favorite questions here to ask at the CoSell Show is, what is something fun about you that our listeners cannot find on the old LinkedIn profile?

Bart Bradshaw:
So this is always a hard question for me. I spend a ton of time just thinking about startups and spending time with family. I think the most fun thing about me is that I have four little girls.

Ages like, what are they right now? Two, four, seven and nine. And so I'm one guy among ... I have girls in my house and we just have a blast. Yeah. And people ask me like, are you going to go for that son? One, for four kids is enough for me. It's a lot and I want to make sure that I have the time and attention to spend with the ones that I have. But two, I couldn't ask for a better life than living with my five girls.

Taylor Baker:
Aww, that's really sweet. Thank you so much for sharing that. It's funny you're definitely not alone in the sentiment of a lot of times when I ask people this question they're like, "Well, I work all the time." So that's very, very common. But it's nice your silver lining of all your amazing work is your five leading ladies in your life.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, I can say that my wife and I decided that 2020 is our year of fun. So we're going to branch out a little bit. We've been workaholics for the last, I don't know, 14 years. And now we've layered on top of that family, but we're going to make sure that we have a ton of fun in 2020, and certainly, you and any of your listeners are welcome to join us.

Taylor Baker:
Yes. Do you have anything in mind?

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, we're going to prioritize friends and getting together regularly with friends. We're going to do in February ... We actually recently got together with some of our favorite people. We're going to do every other month or so, a unique and fun party. We're going to do an escape room at our house that we're going to create for our friends in February.

Taylor Baker:
Interesting.

Bart Bradshaw:
So that'll be fun. And yeah, other things to be determined.

Taylor Baker:

Well, I mean, that's nice ... You have the monthly thing going for you and then you get to have the fun and the creativity of designing your own scape group. So that'll be really interesting. Very cool.

Bart Bradshaw:

Yeah.

Taylor Baker:
I know we have a short amount of time, so I want to get into some of your amazing history and insights. So Blip amplifies marketing results. So what are some of the biggest mistakes that you have seen companies make on the marketing and or advertising side of things?

Bart Bradshaw:

Oh, I think there's so many because marketing and advertising is not easy. I think a lot of the time we as marketers or advertisers, we find ourselves thinking we've found something that works, and that's great. You need to find something that works. But thinking too narrowly is sometimes a problem where you find something that works, and then you don't continue to explore and invest in figuring out the next thing.

You may overspend on one channel or medium because of that. You don't know what you don't know with marketing, and that's always the hard thing. So yes, you need to find that one channel or medium that works, maybe two. But you'll always need to be investing at least a small part of your budget on exploring additional marketing channels and mediums. And when you find additional ones, you need to figure out ways to make them amplify each other and think about it from a funnel.

And when people aren't thinking about it from a funnel perspective and lining up those channels and mediums to different parts of the funnel, it starts to be less effective. Your return on ad spend is less than it could be. With Blip, like you said, it amplifies marketing results where at the top of the funnel we do billboards. It's a broadcast medium. And if people are just online, you certainly can have your whole funnel online, right? You can get the word out online. You can have engagement and then you can target, retarget, and convert online.

Ultimately though, you're spending more, especially at the top end of the funnel on that initial outreach, that initial awareness. So just thinking through, what is the right channel or medium for what phase of the funnel, and making sure that you never limit it just to one or two that seeme to be working because ultimately, you don't want to be reliant on that. You want to diversify. There's a lot to think about that.

Taylor Baker:
So you mentioned a little earlier that you worked with Blip prior to your current position in partnerships. So how exactly does Blip engage in partnerships? Are you facilitating co-marketing relationships for your billboard advertisements? Or what kind of partnership gamuts you guys run in?

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah. Our biggest program that we set up this past year is we had a ton of organic interest from agencies, marketing and advertising agencies that work with clients and manage different campaigns for those clients. And they were starting to use Blip and our direct platform for their clients. And so we said, "Hey, we should create a partnership program that caters to their needs, that starts to create some product features for them, make it easier for them." And that's what we've built. That's probably the, I don't know, 70, 80% of what we've done so far.

And that's fantastic because it just makes sense for us to partner with agencies and vice versa. They use digital online Google, Facebook, other channels and mediums for their clients. And then if they can layer on some broadcast advertising through Blip and others, like I was just mentioning, it helps to amplify and really increase ROI for their clients. So that's a very natural partnership. We have done some co-marketing. We've done some sponsorship sharing, maybe doing some free advertising for various events and getting exposure that way. We've really tried to figure out where the right co-marketing relationships are. But we haven't built a robust platform around that yet. We've just dipped our toes.

Taylor Baker:
Well, it sounds like you guys are having a lot of success organically. I mean, that's a nice first step for sure.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, absolutely.

Taylor Baker:
So as listeners, as you can probably tell, Bart's sweet, sweet, smooth voice has definitely graced the channels of the podcast waves before. And he is a host on Blip's podcasts called Built to Stay where you have interviewed dozens of thought leaders in business and beyond. So what are some of the overlapping business, and honestly life in general, best practices that you have learned from your guests?

Bart Bradshaw:
It's a great question. I'm continually floored by how awesome people are. And hosting a podcast and being able to invite really cool people who have done impressive things is just a treat. One of the things that I've noticed is you only see a very small part of somebody online or if they're a founder of a business and you see their online persona. You don't know a lot about them. Whenever I invite someone on, I'm always ... I can't think of one guest that I've been less impressed with after the interview.

And a lot of that comes down to just their authenticity, which is a huge thing right now. Like, oh, influencers and authenticity. Ultimately, I do think that success comes to people who are authentic, who are real with their relationships, who value a longterm perspective. And that's really what Built to Stay is meant to do is to parse out what are the things that help you build a business for longterm success?

And I think that one of the main things I've learned is these, a lot of people are really making good decisions based on a longterm perspective. So that may mean that they may sacrifice a little bit of ... On a transaction, they may give a little bit more than they need to, or they invest heavily to ensure that relationships are longterm positive and they're not trying to take more than they should from a situation where they may be have the upper hand. I'm being a little vague, but I guess I feel like those principles, more than anything, are what I've learned and really I'm trying to implement in my own work here at Blip and then also in my own life.

Taylor Baker:

Bart, I have to tell you, I could not agree with you more. You are my 21st interview here at the CoSell Show. And every single person I've had on that's part of the reason we love asking that second question, what's something fun about you that we can't find on your LinkedIn? Because whether it's LinkedIn or Instagram or Twitter, whatever your vice is on social media, it is a highlight reel of someone's life and you can ...

The online persona someone has is so different than the actual human being on the other side of those photos and images. And every single person I've interviewed is constantly surprised me with something unique, or interesting, or just, in general, I've had long conversations about what social media has done to relationships. It's such an interesting and really privileged thing we both get to do here.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, absolutely.

Taylor Baker:
So on the contrary, what are some of the horror stories, maybe, that you've heard from some of your guests? Maybe mistakes, business faux paws that they've given your listeners and how they can avoid those same bad fates?

Bart Bradshaw:
Oh man. Probably the worst horror story that we heard recently was someone who had a bad partnership and almost lost his business because of this. The partner really like took advantage of him and tried to basically take all the profit and the business when he tried to expand overseas. And ultimately, it was a two or three-year battle that he ultimately got the company back.

But man, to be connected to a bad partner over a long period of time is a horror story in my mind. Being partners, partnerships are important, and they are so important, in fact, that we need to all make sure that we have the right partnerships in place at the front end, put maybe in place the right structure that allows for, if something turns out to be wrong, it's not the end of the world.

So that's one horror story. Another one that's very common in terms of just something that almost everybody, I asked the question, what would you do differently to most of my guests? And almost everybody at one point or another realizes that they should have hired an expert sooner. They should have brought on somebody with the knowledge to get them to the next level faster, which is always interesting because it can be expensive to bring on experts. It can be an investment. And ultimately, a lot of us like to learn as we go. We're just like, "Well, we can do that."

But at the same time, if you can bring on the right people, bring the right people on the bus, as some people say, you can really accelerate things and take advantage of their experience, their relationships, their strategic expertise and accelerate things. So the horror stories that you just spin your wheels for years and years when you could've just easily gotten to the next level without doing that.

Taylor Baker:

Oh sure. So I am a little curious, and I have to dial back a little to your first horror story that you shared there. Do you know what went wrong? Were they maybe a poor partnership pairing from the get go? Or was there something where maybe the guy just revealed something about themselves throughout the partnership? What was the point when he knew it was bad?

Bart Bradshaw:
Well, he knew it was bad when ... What basically happened was he started a company. It's a food, what do you call it? It's a full meal replacement. And he partnered with somebody who had a warehouse that he could do the food production in. And this partner was fine for the first year or two or so. But when he decided to move overseas and open a US entity, he basically said, "Hey, can you keep the lights on and keep this running here and I'm going to ..."

Well, here's what he did wrong. I think he resigned from his place as CEO so that the other could lead it, his partner could lead it, while he went and spent all his time in the US building the new US business. But what happened was once he resigned, the partner stopped paying him, or stopped paying him almost anything. I think he paid him a pittance and then he increased his own salary like crazy. Then he started to ... He built another business that he started to do all distribution through. So his funneling basically all of the revenue through his own separate business.

So it was just, I think, two things. One, you made some bad decisions about how to structure this expansion overseas. And then two, he trusted this partner and put a lot of the decision making power in these hands maybe too early or in a way that he just shouldn't have so that the other could do some nefarious things behind his back.

Taylor Baker:
Yeah, sounds like it. I've had a lot of guests share little tiny versions of that. That's just like, "We started and we ..." A big overarching theme I get is you need to have aligned values and the baseline. And most people are like, "We didn't. And then we went our separate ways." But I have not had anyone be like, "Someone tried to steal my entire business through a partnership." Yikes.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, it was a little crazy. If you want to hear the full story, it's on Built to Stay. It's called Standing Your Ground and it's Joey Van Koningsbruggen, if I said that right.

Taylor Baker:
That is definitely a mouthful. Don't worry. We'll find that episode and link to it so you guys can hear more about that. Interesting. And actually, very true to the name horror story. So something that is very prominently featured on your LinkedIn that I was a huge fan of, it said you are passionate about solving a very interesting problem, which is people selecting and pursuing, as you call it, a sub-optimal career path. How exactly are you hoping to solve this problem?

Bart Bradshaw:
It's a huge problem. So I don't know that I alone can solve it. But it is something that I am passionate about and I have been thinking about for many years because when I graduated from undergrad, I had felt like I was pretty successful in most areas of my life. At school, I was good at academics. I had been in student government. I had done sports and all that kind of thing. All over sudden, I realized ... I had thought of a couple of potential career paths and everything, but ultimately, when I got to the next level of exploring those, I realized they weren't for me.

And so all of a sudden I was like, "Holy cow, I have this world of possibilities, a world of opportunities out there. So many different career paths I could go down, but I don't know which one's right for me. And I don't know what I'm passionate about. And I don't know what the market really needs." And ultimately, I can get good at anything if I try. But I didn't have a ... My undergrad was in comparative literature. I had done some internships in finance and a few other things. So I had some stepping stones.

But I was looking from joining the CIA to being a doctor and doing premed stuff and shadowing doctors. I actually fainted twice. But they told me that's not a problem and that I could still be a doctor. Plenty of people do that. Ultimately, though, I felt like at a time when I should have been super excited and happy, I felt more stressed and out of it than I ever had. I was like, "Oh wow, I was not prepared."

And I think that there's a lot of others. At Blip here we have a ton of awesome people who work here. And when I managed them and talk to them about their careers and where they want to go, and this has been the same wherever I've worked in the past 15 years. They're like, "Yeah, I don't really know what I want to do, or how I can get the career that I want."

So ultimately, how do you solve this problem? There's a lot of companies that are trying to build solutions around how to transition from where you are to where you want to be. There's companies that are trying to get the best fits for a company. So hiring, getting the right fit candidates there are schools that help you transition. There's MBA programs, all those kinds of things are solutions to this problem. There's tons of online education.

Ultimately, though, I think that I want to go back. I want to go earlier in our education. I love education. I have three different degrees from UT, BYU, from Duke. I love education and I'm good at it. But man, I can make the most of that education if I were more prepared. And I found that each time that I did do a degree, the better prepared I was to take advantage of that degree, the much more effective and efficient and wonderful it was for me.


So ultimately with my little girls bringing it back, I've already started to introduce careers and have them do little entrepreneurial things. I'm exploring design with Adobe Illustrator with my nine-year-old daughter. It's just super fun. And what I want her to do, and all of my girls, is to have a little bit more exploration of their own passions, their interests, their skills, get to a level that is beyond what I did in terms of any specific marketable skill sets at a younger age.

And this is not to guide them to a specific path. Not at all. It's more just, I'd say, layering on a level of exploration that goes one level, two levels, three levels deep so that they are better prepared. And instead of getting to college and being at a college level academically but not at a college level career-wise and skill-wise and knowing yourself, and how you might impact the world. Getting to college and you're at a college level on that side as well. I've now mentored a few people through the process and they hit the ground running and they're loving it. It's just so fun to see people meet their potential earlier and be able to make the most of it.

Taylor Baker:
Absolutely. So what do you think is the driving force leading people down these wrong, as it were, a career paths? Is it the lack of structure or tools or adventures leading up to it? Or do you think it's maybe something like, "I chose this career because I thought I would make a lot of money but I'm not happy doing it"? What do you think is leading people down these paths?

Bart Bradshaw:
I think that if you think about ... There's a Venn diagram that's really useful to think about. The top circle is your passions, your interests, your values. The bottom left circle is your capabilities, your skills, and the bottom right circle is what the market needs and will pay for. I think that most people don't really know their interests, passions, values to any real degree because they haven't done a lot of exploration. I was like, "Oh, what am I passionate about? I love movies. Maybe I could be ... No, I don't really want to take notes during a movie. I just want to watch it and enjoy it. It could be a movie review. I love going to the lake and boating."

Bart Bradshaw:
At that age, I just had no idea what I loved or what I was passionate about in terms of how I could impact the world. So I think that's a big problem is like there's not a lot of ... In academics, you explore academics and you don't necessarily ... Some people do and they do a great job. There's projects. Engineers start doing computer science or electrical engineering at a young age with their parents or with friends.

Some people do. I did not. And I think there's a lot of others who don't also explore those interests to any great degree. And then also developing those skills. The third part is really knowing the market. And this is where today is different than ages past. We can do anything. The internet, our technology, our ability to move anywhere, we can do anything. The options are endless.

And so, in order to really make it a good decision, you should understand your options and alternatives. And if you don't have a good perspective on all of the things out there that you could do, it's hard to make a really good decision. I mean, you might come across one thing and be like, "Oh sure, yeah, I want to be a dentist because my dad's a dentist, or I like my dentist." But ultimately, can you compare that to the thousands or tens or hundreds of thousands of other options with any real degree of context?

And the answer is generally no. So some people are okay with that. The way my brain thinks, I have to see the big picture. I have to understand my options before I can really dig into something and be fully all in and committed. I think that if you just think about that Venn diagram, it's exploration. Your own passions and interests, your own capabilities and skills, and lastly, understanding really what kind of opportunities are out there and having a framework to think through.

Taylor Baker:
I think that's really great advice. Also, a big issue is, I suggested towards this a little bit as far as maybe some people choosing a career path because of, "Oh, I think I'll be happy because I'll make a lot of money doing this." But I think a sub-level side to that is, are you pursuing something for the right reasons?

Taylor Baker:
You mentioned movies, for example. I have a film degree, which is definitely, I actually had a teacher in college referr to it as an application. My film degree being an application to work at Kirby Lane, which is a popular cafe here in Austin. And I was like, "Wow, really inspirational. Thank you." But I think I found a lot of people they would go into, especially in guys like film they're like, "Oh, I want to be Steven Spielberg. I want to be famous."

I'm like, "Well, why do you want that? Do you want that because you want to be rich and have a lot of money and people adore you? Or do you genuinely want to change people's lives through the art of film?" I think the same goes really for any career path. You have to want it for the right reasons. And circling back to that authenticity, you have to be authentic about why you want something.

Bart Bradshaw:

Yeah and I think the reason there is just a false passion, or a false interest like, "I just want to make money." Ultimately, that's not going to drive you, unless you really are truly passionate about money somehow. Most people are not passionate about money. They're passionate about what it can do for them. It's really more about ... A false passion is not going to get you through the hard things and challenges that make a career successful at the investment that has to go into it.

The things that are going to make most people successful are real passions, real values that align your work and your challenges and everything with what you truly believe in and want to accomplish. And so, yeah, I think that ... Again, the Venn diagram helps and the exploration of your passions and interests really should come down to, "Well, what do you really want in life? And it can be tempting to think it's money. Certainly money is a part of life and you have to provide. But ultimately, the people who are most fulfilled are fulfilled because they're doing something that they truly value.

Taylor Baker:
Oh, absolutely. So on that note, a sidestep to it, you talk a lot also about side hustles. So as the co-founder and COO of a company called London Littles, you are clearly doing a great job of managing a full-time career at Blip in addition to one of many other side hustles. How do you manage and balance your career with these, as you like to call them, side hustles?

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah, I call it side hustle because I do think it's important to ... Especially for me in a situation where I'm a full-time, I have a full-time role at Blip. I need to make sure that for myself and for others that they see that London Littles, for example, is a side hustle. I want people to know that I'm here. I'm in it to win it for Blip and you can expect my full-time best effort.

I actually am all about side hustles even for the people that work on my teams and anyone really because I think side hustles are a great way to continue to explore and learn and be engaged in other ways that can help you I think be better on your day job as well. So managing all of that is hard and it takes some sacrifices. Like I don't get to watch Netflix as much as a lot of people. But it actually aligns with my values, which my values are all around startups and improving the economy and learning and growing, and creating opportunities to work with my children. Like my nine-year-old is helpful with London Littles as well. And it's so fun to see her helping us do some of the quality check of our little kids, rain boots and things.

I just find a lot of value from that. Yeah, it's hard to manage and ultimately we could have grown London Littles a lot bigger by now if I were spending more time on it. But you just have to pick and choose and decide where are you going to put most of your chips and then you have a few other chips in other places and time and ... It is a balance.

Taylor Baker:
I completely understand that balance and that side hustle. So how exactly though do you determine what has the makings of a side hustle versus what's a career like? Obviously, I mean, you're already on that road where you have this job at Blip and then you started London littles. But maybe not using that specific example, but at what point would a side hustle be like, "Oh, well, now I'm going to go do this instead"? How do you manage those expectations?

Bart Bradshaw:

I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur way back when I was graduating college. But I had also just gotten married and we were talking about what's the right way to go after it to be ... I asked my wife the question, do you want to support us for five years while I build a startup and try to make enough money to support us? At the time, that didn't make sense for us.

And what we've talked about a lot over the years is for a lot of people, it doesn't make sense to go all out on a startup. There's limited runway. You know you're going to have challenges. You know you're going to have to adapt and adjust. And so a side hustle can be, one, it can be great just in and of itself, but it can also be the right way to start something that has the makings of a full blown startup or a career for you.

The way I look at it is right now Landon littles is a side hustle. If, for some reason, I stopped working at Blip, which is not my plan at all, but if I did, I could certainly start to put more time into London littles. And I think that it could become a bigger, more exciting startup. But it just depends for me is London Littles my next startup? I don't know. It's super fun. I love it as a side hustle. The question just becomes, is that the one I want to put the majority of my effort into? Or is it going to stay a side hustle and be a super fun thing with my family and everything? But ultimately, I'm going to continue to work on these potentially higher leverage tech startup sort of opportunities.

But yeah, I think that you define is it a side hustle or not? And you decide, or let the market decide too depending on demand and traction and everything, is this the next thing? Because if London Littles was just taken off, and if it was doing many, many millions a year, I would have a harder time justifying I'm not putting more time into it. And I think you learn fairly quickly once you start a side hustle how much effort it takes, and whether or not it's just going to take off.

A lot of people are like, "Ah I started this as just a side thing and then Holy cow, the demand was crazy and we got picked up by all these news outlets and all of a sudden we had to just go for it." That doesn't happen in the majority of situations, but when it does happen a lot of the time, that's when you choose, "Okay, we're going after this."

Taylor Baker:
Sure. Yeah. I mean, that's kind of the dream, I guess, right? And having someone be like, "All right, let me put this for you on a silver platter. You're getting all this publicity. You're doing really well."

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah. And sometimes it takes time for that to happen too. More and more I recognize usually it takes about five years for anything to really start to take off.

Taylor Baker:
Oh, absolutely. And especially this is very, very common in the entertainment industry that people recognize overnight success when somebody wins an award or gets a claim for something. But everyone is always like, "No, no, I've been working really hard for 15 years and this was just the first time anybody's ever heard of me."

Bart Bradshaw:
Exactly.

Taylor Baker:
Wonderful. Well, Bart, you have been a total dream. Do you have anything exciting coming up that you want to share with our listeners?

Bart Bradshaw:
Oh man, that is an interesting question. For me, everything's exciting, but what's exciting for your listenera? Like I said, 2020-

Taylor Baker:
It could be exciting for you.

Bart Bradshaw:
... 2020 is the year of fun. So everyone should do that with us. Blip is introducing subscriptions and really catering to the needs of customers. That's exciting. We're also growing quickly. So if you're in the Utah area or want to be, reach out to me for opportunities to work here. What else is exciting, Taylor?

Taylor Baker:
I mean, I think the year of 2020 being fun is pretty exciting.

Bart Bradshaw:
That's probably the most exciting thing. Making sure to prioritize the things that mean the most, which are people and relationships, especially now that we have some things started. It's a great time to reprioritize and hire the right people to keep things going and then spend the time that we need to have a full life, right?

There's only a certain amount of time that you can put certain things on the back burner. I realized yesterday I was thinking about this. Two things I never want to put on the back burner, one is my own health, and two is my kids. Maybe a couple of days out of town or whatever. But ultimately, they can never be on the back burner. Everything else, for a certain amount of time, can be put on the back burner. And we've done that for many years. Like I mentioned, Netflix, not that I want to take that off of the back burner.

But for me now, coming into the season that I'm in, prioritizing those relationships and making sure to have some of that fun and those hobbies that enrich your life, I think that's actually really exciting to take off of the back burner and start to explore more so that we can live that full life.

Taylor Baker:
Absolutely. I'm really, really jazzed to hear you say that. And I've been getting that a lot more have having my guests talking more about trying to have an actual work/life balance and not just work, work, work, work, work, work, work.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah. Yeah.

Taylor Baker:
So I'm really happy to hear that it's finally happening nationwide. That people are like, "Oh wait, maybe I shouldn't be answering emails at 11:30 at night."

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah.

Taylor Baker:
I actually had a fascinating interview with a woman named [Claudia 00:36:31] Higgins yesterday who is Irish and she's done a lot of work internationally and currently lives in Ireland, but is in South Africa right now. But she was saying one of her clients that she works with there company-wide, they do not receive emails after 6:00 PM. If you try to email someone after 6:00, they won't receive it until the following morning.

Bart Bradshaw:
Oh, that's cool.

Taylor Baker:
I was like, "What? That needs to be so much more common everywhere." I'm really happy to hear you prioritizing. It's amazing how many people are like, "Oh, my health isn't a big deal. Let me focus more on this." But it's good that you're prioritizing your health and your family.

Bart Bradshaw:
Yeah. If you understand your priorities, it helps a lot.

Taylor Baker:
Absolutely. I'm sure our listeners are going to have some followup questions for you. How can they reach you?

Bart Bradshaw:
Easiest way is just Bart, B-A-R-T, @Blipbillboards.com. Yeah, I'm happy to chat about any sort of partnerships. I also do a little bit of a career coaching. I love working with people along a lot of different lines. So feel free to reach out if anything in this sounded interesting or you want to just start a conversation.

Taylor Baker:
Of course. And don't worry, listeners, I will link to his email as well as his podcast, and all the other amazing things we've talked about today. Bart, thank you so, so very much. You have been a wonderful guest. And I'm really excited that our listeners get to hear your awesomeness.

Bart Bradshaw:
Thank you, Taylor. It's been a pleasure.

Taylor Baker:
And to all of our listeners out there, thank you for listening and be sure to tune in next week for even more exciting co-selling content. Now, go get your partnership on.

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