Startups

Episode 24: Trey Roth, Founder & CEO of Yaystack (Pt. 2)

Trey talks about how working as a music producer prepared him to be an entrepreneur, the 'gift of the gap' and what breaks his heart. 


This week on The CoSell Show we are thrilled to have back with us Trey Roth, the founder and CEO of Yaystack

Topics Covered:

    • Asking yourself “what breaks my heart” when determining your brand’s purpose

    • Using the “gift of the gap” to your advantage

    • How working as a music producer prepared Trey to be an entrepreneur 

Brought to you by our host: Taylor Baker for CoSell.io

 

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Follow Along With The Podcast Transcript

Taylor Baker:
Welcome back to the CoSell Show. If you heard our last episode, you know that this week we are bringing you part two of our conversation with Trey Roth, the founder and CEO of Yaystack. Last week we talked about the importance of your brand story and how to leverage strategic partnerships to mutually benefit your customers and your company. This week we are going to discuss why you should ask yourself, what breaks my heart? When determining your brand's purpose, how you can use the gift of the gap to your advantage, and how working as a music producer prepared Trey to be an entrepreneur. All of this and more in this episode. So without further adieu, I would like to welcome back Trey Roth, the CEO of Yaystack.

Taylor Baker:
So I want to shift gears a little bit because you and I had the pleasure of chatting a bit before we actually had this current conversation and we talked about some awesome stuff that I want to share with our listeners as well. So when we first spoke, you mentioned that you founded your company after asking yourself the question, what breaks my heart? Can you tell our listeners a little bit more about how that approach helped you find purpose in business?

Trey Roth:
Absolutely. I appreciate the question. Let me just set the stage by saying, if you're looking for a way to understand your purpose and like, hey, why are you here? In my experience, a fantastic question to process and to answer in multiple seasons of life is, what breaks your heart? And your specific answer to that question is tied to your purpose, to be a remedy, to be a part of solving that problem, whatever breaks your heart. So just for what it's worth. So on the business side with Yaystack, goodness, like for me, my friends allowed me to live my dream. The business was growing all based on word of mouth referrals and it was wonderful.

I just realized they moved too slowly and there're so many wonderful, I mean, diamonds inside people that are withheld, they're not shared. And if they're shared, it's over a cup of coffee three years after you will have had a positive experience with a product or service. And that diamond is valuable both to the recipient of the share, your referral, and goodness, the brand that caused that remarkable experience. So for me, what breaks my heart are like, man, the early stage, like the solopreneurs, the entrepreneurs, the young, hungry startups and even Shark Tank like companies where they, I mean, they've risked a lot. They're doing things they've never done before. They're scared.

There's just a lot that goes into the entrepreneurial experience. So what breaks my heart is people have so many wonderful authentic referrals that they're not sharing to Facebook, they're not sharing to Instagram, they're not sharing elsewhere. And even those who are sharing like in a Snap story or whatever, or an Instagram story and it disappears or it's lost in the noise and it doesn't have the impact that it could have given a place that's designed to capture and stack that information and bring an audience that's looking for, what should I try? What's something new to... I want to explore and discover the best finds from my best friends. And I want to elevate my life in one way, shape, or form. But I don't want to do it based on an ad.

I want to know the people that I love, the people that I trust, the thought leaders that I respect, what do they advocate? And so those diamonds, there're so many diamonds inside people that can truly even stimulate the economy. And that's another part of what breaks my heart. And so yeah, when you put a dollar into the marketplace, you're strengthening the economy. It's your vote on who wins. Every dollar that you put in the marketplace, whether you're buying some on Amazon, you're buying a cup of coffee at a boutique or whatever it is, you are helping make somebody's dream come true to some degree and you're literally strengthening the economy. But your share can be just as impactful, if not like several times more impactful than just your dollar in the marketplace.

So that's just something to think about. Like, hey, your referral matters. Your voice matters. Maybe you would say that you're... You might not identify as an influencer. You might not even identify as a micro influencer, but goodness, you have influence. If you have a mouth and can speak words and if you're buying stuff, congratulations, you have influence and you can make a positive impact on your community and truly help those around you in a way that not only your dollar helps, but truly, your share helps as well. So you asked what breaks my heart. Goodness.

A gift that I would love to leave humanity other than my four children being so, goodness, wonderful in the ways that they are. And then of course, to fulfill our mission at Yaystack to truly make the world a more remarkable place by being the place to remark. Also, I'd love to give humanity tools and tactics and understandings and a more truthful perspective of how wonderful life is so that those that we positively impact have an ever growing ability to experience the miracle of the moment.

Taylor Baker:
Wow. Words to live by. Kind of in that vein actually, because I know we talked a little bit about this. You talked about the gift of the gap as in the distance between where you are and where you want to be. A lot of people that are in that gap are really unhappy and they put themselves or rather their goals on this pedestal of being like, I will be happy when I get this job, I get this house, I have this much money, whatever their then is. But then they spend the time in between where they are and then that pedestal moment just miserable.

And then honestly what I've seen happen a lot is that once people get that pedestal thing, they're just like, "Oh well, no, wait, now I got this, now I have to get the next thing." And so you're just constantly setting yourself up to be unhappy. So tell us how to enjoy the gift of the gap.

Trey Roth:
Absolutely. I appreciate that question. There are multiple gardens of life as a friend of mine puts it and some people have like, just their finances and their financial freedom is just, goodness, just on this crazy level, but their relationships are in shambles or whatever. Now there are people who do have their gardens of life very well kept and they exemplify possibility, which I really love. So one hack, there's a couple hacks as far as like how does one have a healthy relationship with the gift of their gap? Well, first of all, see it as a gift. Like okay, you know where you want to be, you know what you want to accomplish. That's fantastic. A lot of people don't have that vision. And then as scripture says, where there is no vision, people perish.

Well, the same is true with relationships. If your relationship, you don't have some kind of vision for where you're headed together, then that's not nearly in my experience as impactful and powerful as having a vision for this is what we're working towards. We're together in regards to the vision that we're building. And instead of just aimlessly navigating and journeying through life, there is something that we're headed towards, that we're working towards, that we're excited to work towards. So first of all, acknowledge it as a gift because without it, without this gift of the gap between where you are now and where you want to be, without knowing where you want to be, then it's aimless and it's like, it's not as fun as being intentional.

And it's also said that progress equals happiness. Well, in my experience, progress at any level... So say that you have a gift of the gap of 1,000 miles, right? It's 1,000 miles of walking for you to go from where you are to where you want to be. You know it's going to take a long time. It's going to take a lot of work. This is going to take dedication, but goodness, even if you're just on your first mile, progress feels great at any mile. Whether it's your first or your 10th or your hundredth or your 999th, progress [inaudible 00:09:03] and so one hack is just to acknowledge, am I going to [inaudible 00:09:08] progress today? I have a well-defined goal, I know where I want to be. I know I'm not there, but I made progress today towards it and goodness, that feels amazing.

That's a part of being a great journeyer of life. And so a hack or one way to appreciate that gift of the gap is to bring it to your conscious awareness. I made progress towards a goal today and let that fuel you and inject you with the happiness that we all crave.

Wow. I have so many follow up question but we are running toward the end of our time together. So I want to get in a couple of more questions really fast, but thank you so much for sharing it. That is so insightful. So you had mentioned earlier that you produced music for over seven years and there's actually a ton of my guests that have been in music, whether they played guitar or were in a band or I have one of our early guests is actually in a band in Austin called the Dad Bods and they perform in just like fun little family functions and then some people are in choir and then some people just love music.

But I'm curious what you may have learned from producing music that has helped you in your more like entrepreneurial or business like endeavors.

Trey Roth:
Absolutely. That's a fantastic question. You're a great question asker by the way. You have great [crosstalk 00:10:39]. So I appreciate that.

Taylor Baker:
Thank you.

Trey Roth:
Very high quality questions. So yeah, I didn't realize that my music journey was setting me up well for my tech journey. As an entrepreneur in music, we would get together, I'd work with an artist and then we would assemble a team. Normally we would find session players that made for a great combination to make a unique sound and all this. And basically we would take these songs and we would work through the songs to make sure that the tempo was right and that the cadence was right, that the story was right, that the way that the listener felt after hearing the song was right, etc, etc. So we'd work through the song and we'd pull teams together, we'd work in the studio and basically take concepts and ideas out of thin air really.

And then not only make something that was competitive, but something world-class and something that stood on its own and had a voice in music that was unique and compelling. And so I went through this process with countless artists and session players and songs and ideas and it's almost like every project was its own mini startup. And I learned all kinds of things through that process. And so really I feel like I had, I don't know, in a way hundreds of startups that led me to this one and it prepared me to do what I'm doing today. So you don't know that like with what you're doing... And again, I thought I was going to do music forever, little did I know that this life turn was around the corner, which by the way, I've got to say, there was a moment where I felt very tangibly something is about to change.

We had a big life transition in a very positive way where we just had a quantum leap. So yeah, you never know like what quantum leaps are just around the corner. You never know just how close you are to your next breakthrough. And it makes life so exciting. So with whatever you're doing, however you're serving people and however you're serving the marketplace and whatever your job looks like, you never know how that might apply in the future. Maybe differently, maybe in a way that you didn't anticipate or expect, but it's a way in which you can serve people. It's a way in which you can be the guide to their heroic story, which is so well articulated by Donald Miller in StoryBrand, which shout out, word of mouth referral, check out StoryBrand if you haven't.

I love Donald Miller, and Donald talks about be the guide. You're the guide and they're the hero and so you dive into that, it's pretty great. But you just never know how like what you're doing now can apply in the future to create more value for more people. And this is just one reason to be super excited about every day, to discover in many occasions just how close you are to your next breakthrough.

Taylor Baker:
That's such a nice way of thinking about that. I've definitely been in a lot... I did not have that spidey-sense that I was like, the quantum leap is coming or something's about to change. A lot of it was just life really just happened and there were choices made, but in a lot of ways, some of it does wash over you and life happens and those changes are somewhat made for you. But I'm going to merge these next two questions together in the sense of, in your case with that transition from music to entrepreneurship and you having that quantum leap spidey-sense feeling, was there something that inspired that specifically? Did it really come out of nowhere and then what advice would you give to people that may or may not be on that new horizon of some sort of wins are changing, careers are changing?

Trey Roth:
Well, I appreciate that. Again, great question. So it goes back to earlier in our conversation. Taylor, definitely just ask yourself the question, what breaks my heart? And then truly do your best to be a remedy for that. I believe that your personal answer to that question is tied directly to your purpose. And we, like this morning sending our kids off to school, I said, "Hey, look, I hope you'll have a great day, but look for a way to help others have a great day. Go up to the teacher and tell them something that you're thankful for or grateful for or compliment them and make it unexpected. Or maybe you can look around the room and see, does anybody look lonely? And go up to that person and talk to that person."

Yeah, let's have a great day, but let's help others have a great day as well. And so I believe as adults, we forget the simplest things that make life truly wonderful, which is like a desire to create value and to help our fellow men and women. So I think that for those who are looking to go ahead and end the chapter and start a new one, which we've all been there and we all have more chapters ahead of us, ask yourself that question and just make it like a game. Make it like a game where you're truly looking for a way to help brighten somebody else's day. But then obviously when you use your unique skill sets and your unique background and you do it in the marketplace as a job, of course, there's a tendency to be fired up and excited about the value that comes your way in the form of money, of course.

But then, goodness, but for you to be fired up about the problem you're solving and have an ever rising standard of how much value you're creating, for how many people you're creating it for, and saying no to the things that keep you from creating more value for more people and taking the scary leaps of faith where you say no to the predictable, to the certain when you're basically going through your life and you have a certain level of certainty and uncertainty. And so when you choose, you know what, I'm going say no to this certainty, which is actually certainly a good thing. But when you say no to the good thing in order to say yes to the great thing, but you don't know what all that looks like.

One reason to set a goal isn't just to accomplish the goal, but to become the person who can. And so understand that it's a natural part of your journey as you navigate your next steps and as you discover what is your next chapter? What do you want to do? Well, one thing that's really cool is that you're in the position to even have that choice, right? But beyond that, for you to ask yourself, what breaks my heart? Answer that question. But then to truly make it a game where you're looking for ways to help people and serve people and love people and demand of yourself moving forward to leverage your experience, your growing skill sets, your growing abilities to create more value for more people, again, that's a gift of the gap.

Goodness gracious. I personally am not creating nearly as much value for nearly as many people as I trust and believe and know deep down that I will moving forward. So that's the gift of my gap and I look forward to it, but goodness, am I going to wait to be happy until I'm creating more value for more people? No, I mean, I'm enjoying every step of the way. Some steps are more enjoyable than the others, but goodness, I'm not going to wait to be joyful and fulfilled on my way to creating more value for more people. So those are the words I would string together to encourage those like man, just enjoy the ride but certainly have an ever rising standard for the amount of value you're creating for people and the number of people that you're creating that value for.

And then just let that be like this awesome journey that you're on. Know that it's awesome and nothing short of it and identify yourself with who you really are, which you're a winner in your own way. You literally won your first race. So like you out swam everybody and then you became a human. So you were literally born a winner. Yeah. Like you won your first race. And so just keep going, remind yourself of that. Sometimes we need to be reminded of that. You were born a winner, you won your first race. So just keep winning.

Taylor Baker:
You out swam everyone. What a comical and funny way and hilarious and wonderful way of putting that. Oh man, Trey, that was so full circle and I feel like you beautifully tied that up in a beautiful bow.

Trey Roth:
I appreciate that.

Taylor Baker:
You have been an endlessly riveting guest and I know that our listeners are going to want to talk more to you and ask you some more questions. So how can they reach you if they have some more questions?

Trey Roth:
Absolutely. I appreciate that. I would say traditional email, actually, the very best way and what would just make a confetti fall in my life is if you are an iOS user now, Android is coming, but download Yaystack in the App Store. It's haystack with a Y. So Y-A-Y-S-T-A-C-K, Yaystack, to search for that in the App Store, download it. And then I'm @TreyRoth, T-R-E-Y R-O-T-H. And currently I'm kind of like the Tom of MySpace in a way where we're automatically friends and my Yaystack exemplifies, hey, this is what Yaystack looks like right now. And so we're automatically friends and currently I'm doing my best to message downloaders but anyway, direct message me on Yaystack.

Trey Roth:
It's similar to DM on Instagram. And then I would love to be of value, I'd love to be of service, and goodness gracious, I mean, by all means, please, Yaystack. Please stack your yays and let me know what do you recommend, what's on your Oprah's Favorite Things list and what has created joy for you or solved a problem for you that you would recommend to me and your friends? And we would love to help elevate that by definition, remarkable brand and experience and help them grow further, faster. So, yeah, so find me on Yaystack, direct message me there and I'm happy to be of service however I can.

Taylor Baker:
And I am sure you will be wonderfully helpful to everyone. Don't worry, listeners, I will link to all of Trey's links, App Store downloads, Vudu, fun, all around, all the confetti will be easily found. But Trey, thank you so, so incredibly, very much. You have been an absolute dream and I'm so happy to have had you here in the CoSell Show.

Trey Roth:
I so appreciate it. You are a fantastic interviewer. Your questions really have been like the highest quality questions, so I appreciate that because that only draws quality answers. So it's really-

Taylor Baker:
Aw.

Trey Roth:
Yeah.

Taylor Baker:
Thank you.

Trey Roth:
It wouldn't be the same without your questions. So thank you, Taylor.

Taylor Baker:
Thank you. I really appreciate that.

Trey Roth:
My pleasure.

Taylor Baker:
Yay.

Trey Roth:
Yay. I think that yay is appropriate.

Taylor Baker:
Yay. Yeah. Yay. Well, it's the modern day huzzah.

Trey Roth:
There you go.

Taylor Baker:
That would be a funny thing if you did like, I don't know, this would have actually... Well, huzzah is way before 1920s, but if you did like a week where you were like huzzahstack and everybody was huzzahing things.

Trey Roth:
That [crosstalk 00:24:11] is, oh my goodness. Yeah. Ideas.

Taylor Baker:
[crosstalk 00:24:12] a renaissance fair week or something.

Trey Roth:
There you go. Oh my goodness. I love that.

Taylor Baker:
There's a partnership for you to go, I have partnership with your local renaissance fair and people can huzzah their favorite roasted Turkey leg stands and job sting competitions.

Trey Roth:
That's good. That's fantastic.

Taylor Baker:
Wow. Trey, really, thank you. It's funny that you mentioned Gary, is it Vaynerchuk? Vaynerchuk is [crosstalk 00:24:35].

Trey Roth:
That's right. Yeah, Gary V., Gary Vaynerchuk.

Taylor Baker:
Gary V., Yeah, I can definitely, I feel like you are your own, I mean, not like a copy of him. You are your very much own version of that. You have a lot of love and wisdom and just like joy to share and you just genuinely want people's lives to be better, which is really nice. So I'm really, really excited to be able to share your message with the CoSell Show audience.

Trey Roth:
It is my pleasure truly.

Taylor Baker:
And to all of our listeners out there, thank you for listening and be sure to tune in next week for even more exciting content. Now go get your partnership on.

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